Captain Book looks for books…

The Captain loves books.

The Captain loves books.

…every place he goes – even in Port Gamble  on the Kitsap Penninsula Washington.

 

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The Great Dr. Seuss….

We read, we read, we read."  - Captain Book

We read, we read, we read.” – Captain Book

Panda learns from Dr. Seuss… the tick of clocks  and the knock of knocks… the big of boxes full of books.

Read fast. Life is short.

 

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Those old Kindles were pretty slow.

1880s printing press; photo by Morris Russell Pike

1834 printing press Lahina, Maui; photo by Morris Russell Pike

Boy, you’d have to want a book pretty bad to go to all that trouble… casting lead, setting type and so forth. It’s easier now so there’s no excuse… read those books.

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Everybody reads…

It'll take this fellow a good long while to finish the hardback he's reading... however,  you can be sure his duck will stay with him.  Reading is the best! Photo by Barbara Summer.

It’ll take this fellow a good long while to finish the hardback he’s reading… however, you can be sure his duck will stay with him. Reading is the best! – Captain Book.  Photo by Barbara Sumner.

 

 

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Reading is an adventure

Instant adventure after a visit from Captain Book.

Instant adventure during a visit from Captain Book; photo by Linda Lewis.

Captain Book sailed into Kindercare’s back to school fair this morning and gave away 47  books. One little boy couldn’t wait to have his dad take him on an adventure through books (81,000 and counting). You can become an “Icon forLiteracy” too – by encouraging children to read and/or going to Captain Book’s contribute button and making a donation which helps us keep the Good Ship Literacy afloat. – Captain Book

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Read ’til you drop…

We read, we read, we read photo by M. Pike.

Reading in the park; photo by Morris Russell  Pike.

…off to sleep. Like this guy – or – maybe he is meditating on what he just read.

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Poop lantern on the poop deck…

Poop-lanternAye, night on deck of a pirate ship be a lonely, melancholy time, especially at stern on the poop deck where the great lantern hangs.

Aye, we could tell a ships of war by the three poop-lanterns. There were also deck-lanterns, fighting-lanterns , magazine-lanterns, etc.

We knew to douse our poop-lantern and scamper away into the night when we saw a man-o-war approaching.

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The nature of a cannon….

Cannon from the HMS SurpriseA cannon is the well-known piece of artillery, mounted in battery on board a ship. It is made of brass or iron.

The principal parts are:

1st. The breech, together with the cascable and its button, called by seamen the pomelion. The breech in of solid metal, from the bottom of the concave cylinder or chamber to the cascable.

2nd. The trunnions, which project on each side, and serve to support the cannon, hold it almost in equilibrio.

3rd. The bore or caliber, is the interior of the cylinder, wherein the powder and shot are lodged when the cannon is loaded.  The entrance of the bore is called the mouth or muzzle. It may be generally tapering, with the various modifications of first and second reinforce and swell, to the muzzle or forward end.

Aye, she be a beauty.

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Makin’ a sail on a sailing ship….

Old sailing shipLookin’ at the likeness o’ the Good Ship Literacy, an observant bloke will note the prevalence o’ sails on a pirate ship. Ye see all those seams in the sails and the ropes attached to them? There be proper names for each.

To make a sail ye’ll want to be seaming the clothes together; cutting the gores; tabling and sewing on the reef, belly, lining, and buntline bands, roping and marling on the clues and foot-rope. Do these actions and ye’ll be ready to mount the sail.

Aye ye will.

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Mother of wages?

Captain Book's Good Ship Literacy“Mother of wages” you’d think would be referin’ to industrious labor or, for a pirate… findin’ treasure or bringin’ plunder or leadin’ battle or somethin’ akin.

But you’d be in error. By English maritime law, freight became the mother of wages, as the crew were obliged to moor the ship on her return in the docks or forfeit them.

So severely was the axiom maintained, that if a ship was lost by misfortune, tempest, enemy, or fire, wages also were forfeited, because the freight out of which they were to arise had perished with it.

Are you not glad that law was done away with. But come to think of pirates never paid any attention to law anyway. So have done with it.

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